Share this story
Close X
Switch to Desktop Site

Thinking 'right' can add power to your swing

This tip is particularly for those who feel they are not getting as much power into their shots as they ought to be getting. Assuming you are right-handed (If not, reverse the instructions!), take the trouble to train your right side.Right hand, right elbow, right hip, and right leg. Think "All right."

It seems to me a complete misunderstanding to talk of golf being a left-handed game. Or to suggest, as the "square to square" advocates do, that the left side pulls while the right side only pushes. At the top of a full backswing try pushing with the right hand. It's impossible. The right hand also pulls the club down.

About these ads

Preferably with the help of your professional, but alone if you must, practice hitting quite definitely with the right hand but always in such a way that the left wrist stays firm.

Practice also swinging with the right forearm and elbow, as if throwing a fast pitch. On the downswing try, almost, to "drive the right elbow at the ball." (That's the same idea put differently).

Practice starting the backswing by "turning your right side out the way." Take the right hip back. then complete the turn of the shoulders.

And finally practice turning the right shoulder fully. If you stand up and turn both shoulders round to the right you will find that a deliberate effort to turn the right shoulder farther right will give you a fuller shoulder turn than you ever thought possible.

I stress that these are practice ploys. Don't try to bring them all in at once on the course. But you might try one or two out during your practice swings.

There is, however, one right-side element you cant think of regularly in play , and that's the role of the right leg. Make it a buttress. Make it a post stuck at an angle firmly into the ground. Never let it sway.

Learn to swing "all right" and lack of power won't trouble you.

Follow Stories Like This
Get the Monitor stories you care about delivered to your inbox.