Switch to Desktop Site
 
 

Women's portrayal in ads falls behind the times, study finds

About these ads

Women portrayed in magazine advertising continue to lack clearly defined roles, while men are usually in occupational roles, a recent Cornell University study has found.

And while women have been entering the labor force in ever-increasing numbers during the past 50 years, advertising in general has not mirrored this trend, with women's magazines reflecting it the least and business magazines the most.

So says Edward Kain, assistant professor of human development and family studies at Cornell. He reported the findings of his study, done with graduate student Tom Luster, at a recent meeting of the National Council on Family Relations in Washington.

The researchers examined about 2,500 ads from general, women's, and business magazines from the past 50 years to ascertain how men and women have been shown in ads and to determine if those portrayals have changed to reflect modern trends.

''In the 1940s and 1950s, both sexes were shown doing worthwhile things, such as working in or away from home. In 1980, we see more models just looking pretty , doing nothing - particularly the women in women's magazines,'' Mr. Kain reports. ''This clearly doesn't reflect reality.''

In Time and The Saturday Evening Post, the general-readership magazines studied, men were in the ads more and more often each decade. In 1940, they were in slightly more than half the ads, but by 1980 they were in more than two-thirds.

And although men were most common in the business magazines (Fortune and Business Week), and women most common in women's magazines (Good Housekeeping and Ladies' Home Journal), the men were usually in occupational roles, while the women most often were in no clearly discernible role at all.

Next

Page:   1   |   2


Follow Stories Like This
Get the Monitor stories you care about delivered to your inbox.

Share

Loading...