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Stockman's tenure as Reagan's vocal budget chief

Jan. 27, 1981: By a 93-to-0 vote, the Senate confirms David A. Stockman as budget director. Nov. 10, 1981: Stockman gives an interview to Atlantic Monthly magazine. In it, he describes Reagan's tax cut as a ``Trojan Horse'' designed to aid the wealthy.

Nov. 12, 1981: Stockman is summoned to the Oval Office for what he terms a visit to the woodshed.

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April 18, 1983: Stockman warns Reagan that a stalemate with Congress over the budget would probably cut short the economic recovery, and cause deficits to soar to $200 billion a year.

Jan. 19. 1984: Stockman tells Fortune magazine that he does not believe the government could save billions of dollars by cleaning up wasteful programs. He also expressed doubt that Congress would go along with future calls for large budget cuts.

May 23, 1984: Stockman says in a speech to business lobbyists that Reagan's last chance to make sweeping budget cuts will come in the first half of 1985.

Feb. 5, 1985: Stockman, in congressional testimony, describes the military pension system as ``a scandal . . . an outrage.'' He also suggests that farmers want the government to bail them out because of their own bad business decisions, and urges that calls for emergency farm aid be ignored.

Feb. 28, 1985: Stockman defends a plan to abolish the Small Business Administration. Senators tell him: ``You'll lose.''

April 15, 1985: Stockman says further defense cuts would not reverse planned domestic spending cuts.

June 27, 1985: In a speech he thought was off the record, Stockman says the Reagan administration and some congressional leaders have resorted to ``half-truths and downright dishonesty'' in the debate over budget deficits, the New York Times reports. He is also quoted as saying that if the Securities and Exchange Commission had jurisdiction in such matters ``many of us would be in jail.''

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July 9, 1985: The White House announces Stockman's resignation, effective Aug. 1.

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