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Loss of ethics?

The article ``American firm flying Angolan military goods,'' Nov. 17, illustrates that in the capitalist world there are hardly any standards in regards to ethics or morality when it comes to making a fast buck or to protect vested interests; you supply either side or both sides in a conflict to the detriment of the people affected. Tara Wolf Redwood City, Calif.

Look here! Guernsey Le Pelley's ``Looking the part,'' Nov. 18, was compelling. I couldn't resist considering contemporaries who might represent the positions he mentioned.

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John Houseman was instant winner for chief justice of the United States. Edward (the Equalizer) Woodward would make a good justice; Angela Lansbury the female justice.

For Speaker of the House now that Tip O'Neill is gone: Karl Malden, Walter Matthau, or Jack Klugman.

They depict Tip's feisty but firm individuality.

President or vice-president? You can't beat Charlton Heston or John Forsythe in either role.

However, Guernsey didn't explore first ladies. You must admit President Reagan made the right choice there. Nancy fills the image perfectly except when she's leashed to the family dog and jerked to the helicopter. Nancy A. Russell Omaha, Neb.

Although Mr. Le Pelley's column is entitled ``Lightly,'' I wonder if it was not a little too heavy on looks determining the position of an individual. If his point was that Rehnquist, Bush, and Reagan are bland looking and should appear more formidable, fine. What I question is his comparison of Scalia to a local pizza parlor owner. Are pizza parlor owners bland looking or is this an ethnic slur?

Does a Le Pelley look like a cartoonist or a columnist or a wealthy judge? Michele Ponti Boston

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Solo sojourns Phyllis Krasilovsky's article ``Going solo is fun, when done with care,'' in the travel section Nov. 14, is excellent advice for men and women alike.

When traveling alone, you are exposed to twice as much as when traveling with others. Travel by two cuts it down by more than half; travel by three, by more than two-thirds. And traveling in a group cuts it down by 90 percent. Tom Kirkland Anchorage, Alaska

Letters are welcome. Only a selection can be published, subject to condensation, and none acknowledged. Please address to ``Readers Write.''

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