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Women and Male-Dominated Leadership

The fine article "Americans Get Vivid Lesson on Harassment," Oct. 16, shows what an enormous effect Prof. Anita Hill's appearance before the Judiciary Committee has had on the consciousness of America about workplace conduct.To have a confirmation process that relegates women to the role of witness before an all-male committee and then have the nominee confirmed by a full Senate that is 98 percent male is ridiculous. The male-dominated political leadership of the land has once again turned its back on the rights and interests of women. The historical significance of these hearings will no doubt be their effect on women at the polls and elsewhere. Women need to encourage and promote more women to enter the political process and be an active part of the leadership of America. George A. Dean, Southport, Conn.

Most women who have worked in academia or industry know why Anita Hill did not report sexual harassment 10 years ago. As a graduate student, my daughter faced sexual bias, but she did not complain. When she began teaching in a mostly male department, she still found problems. By sheer determination - ignoring comments about the "aggressive woman" on the one hand and her "lovely clothes" on the other - she is finding a network of colleagues who respect her work. Thank you for a balanced account of the problem, of what's being done, and of what women should expect in the workplace. Jane T. Davis, Springfield, Mass.

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Seeking international justice Regarding the opinion-page article "It's Not Too Late to Try Saddam," Oct. 16: In listing those who have taken an interest in the idea of an International Court of Justice, the author should include the US Congress, whose Foreign Operations Appropriations Act of 1990 includes a provision that the president investigate the issue and report back by this month. I also wish that the author pointed out more incisively how national sovereignty can stand in the way of enforcing international law. If the notion that leaders can do whatever they please within their own national boundaries is to be challenged, the idea of national sovereignty must be examined and modified. Ronald J. Glossop, Jennings, Mo.

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