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Out on Video

THE INNOCENTS - A governess takes a position caring for the neglected children of a wealthy man. She becomes convinced that their comfortable estate is haunted by the spirits of two former servants whose lascivious ways corrupted the youngsters in the past and continue to exude a malevolent influence in the present. Or is her belief a delusion caused by some sad imbalance in her own personality? Based on Henry James's short novel "The Turn of the Screw," this is one of the screen's most insinuating and thought-provoking ghost stories. Deborah Kerr gives a splendidly nuanced portrayal of the main character. The great Freddie Francis did the elegant cinematography, and Georges Auric composed the haunting score. Directed in 1961 by Jack Clayton from a screenplay by Truman Capote, William Archibald, and John Mortimer. Unfortunately, this cassette is not "letterboxed" and cuts off the edges of the original wide-screen picture. (Not rated; Fox Video)

THE ROLLING STONES ROCK AND ROLL CIRCUS - Not just the Rolling Stones, but also gifted guests including Jethro Tull and Marianne Faithfull at their hippest, the Who and Taj Mahal a tad below par, an all-star group headed by John Lennon, and some wailing by Yoko Ono that thoroughly avant-gardizes the occasion. Recorded in 1968, the concert is as energetic and extroverted as a three-ring you-know-what. Directed by Michael Lindsay-Hogg. (Not rated; Abkco)

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T-MEN - Setting out to crack a counterfeiting ring, two Treasury agents take on phony identities and infiltrate the gang, knowing their covers might be blown at any moment. Although it was made in 1947, when the shadowy "film noir" cycle was at its height, this crisply shot melodrama wobbles between sinister atmospherics and the straight-talking realism also popular during the postwar era. Lending nuance and intelligence is the approach of director Anthony Mann, always eager to probe an action-movie plot for any psychological depth. Alfred Ryder and Dennis O'Keefe play the heroes, and John Alton did the cinematography. (Not rated; Kino Video)

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