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The struggle to keep peace in Kosovo "Tables turn on serbs in Kosovo" (June 17) illustrates the importance of disarming and disbanding the Kosovo Liberation Army. For two months NATO leaders have spoken about "not standing idly by" or "accepting" ethnic cleansing of Albanians by Serbs in Kosovo.

To show their determination and high morals on this point they have unleashed the most intensive bombing campaign Europe has ever seen, killing hundreds of civilians. They refused to stop the war until all armed Serb forces had retreated from the province, insisting that these were the only conditions under which ethnic Albanian refugees could feel safe enough to return.

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NATO leaders insisted time and again that NATO fought against "ethnic cleansing."

Now that NATO has won all this seems to mean much less. KFOR troops, under command of British General Michael Jackson, stand idly by while KLA guerrillas seize control of Kosovo, killing and intimidating Serb civilians.

In Prizren, German KFOR troops allowed an Albanian mob to jeer, spit, and throw stones on Serb refugees leaving the city. Serb Orthodox monasteries are burned and vandalized and clergy attacked.

NATO is administering the ethnic cleansing of Serbs from Kosovo.

To reach its stated goal of a Kosovo safe for all inhabitants including its minority Serb population, NATO must do to the KLA what it did to Serb military forces in the province - completely disarm them.

If Serbs are to feel safe enough to stay, there can be no role for the KLA or any of its leaders in a future autonomous Kosovo. And if the KLA does not accept this, or tries to "fudge" in any way, NATO will have to deal with it in the same steadfast way that it dealt with Serb forces.

Oskar Lindstrom, Stockholm, Sweden

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Battling racial stereotypes The opinion article "New menace to society?" (June 8) mentions a few stereotypes about black women, including that they are sexually immoral and physically aggressive.

I am still in shock in hearing about these stereotypes. Where did you first hear these stereotypes? In conversations with white women, white men, white people in general, black men, or other ethnic groups?

Because I can assure you that none of the many black women I know fit in this category.

The stereotypes I'm familiar with in terms of black women are that they are good with children, good cooks and good wives, good nurturers, good teachers. When did we fall?

We're smart, ambitious, and hard-working. We're sensual and some of us are physically fit, but that's a huge stretch to sexually immoral and physically aggressive.

Do your family, friends, associates, and acquaintances (who are black women) fit into this category?

I'm puzzled and insulted. I am equally dismayed about the number of people to be innocently gunned down by police in recent times. However, I believe blaming the victim is counterproductive.

Marjorie Allea, Anderson Chicago

Making 'losers' out of winners Congratulations! "If only winners had the dignity of losers" (June 10) said something I've longed to hear for years now. And you said it beautifully.

My adult sons have been "turned off" by watching the poor sportsmanship of today's players. Athletic events will continue to lose favor if such egotistical behavior continues. You said it for many.

Betty Metzler, Pacific Palisades, Calif.

The Monitor welcomes your letters and opinion articles. Due to the volume of mail, only a selection can be published, and we can neither acknowledge nor return unpublished submissions. All submissions are subject to editing. Letters must be signed and include your mailing address and telephone number.

Mail letters to 'Readers Write,' and opinion articles to Opinion Page, One Norway St., Boston, MA 02115, or fax to 617-450-2317, or e-mail to

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