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Orders to US factories increased only 0.3 percent in April after a 4.1 percent jump in March, the Commerce Department reported Monday. The weaker-than-expected gain reflected a drop in orders for cars, commercial planes, and boats.

Police in Washington, D.C., continued to piece together the events that led Tonya Bell of Oxon Hill, Md., to drive through a crowd at a street festival Saturday, injuring at least 40 people, one of whom is still hospitalized. Bell, who was jailed and faced aggravated assault charges in court Monday, had been "smoking crack all day long," according to the police.

The informant who helped undermine a plot to blow up a jet fuel pipeline at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York is a twice-convicted drug dealer, investigators said Sunday. The unidentified man, who became a confidant to the ringleader of a four-man Muslim group suspected of planning a 9/11-magnitude attack, traded his cooperation for a lighter sentence.

If unionized aerospace workers go on strike, as they've threatened to do in a contract dispute, nonunion workers will be used to prepare for NASA space shuttle launches, corporate partners Boeing Co. and Lockheed Martin Corp. said Sunday. A strike vote has raised questions about the scheduled June 8 liftoff of Atlantis and other missions.

Dr. Jack Kevorkian, who was released from prison late last week, vowed on CBS's "60 Minutes" Sunday that he no longer will help people end their lives but will advocate legalizing euthanasia. He once assisted in some 130 suicides and was convicted of second-degree murder.

In Hazleton, Pa., a few hundred people rallied Sunday at City Hall in support of Mayor Lou Barletta, who has proposed penalizing landlords who rent to illegal immigrants and businesses that hire them. Above, an officer stands in front of two of Barletta's vocal backers.

In an eight-candidate presidential campaign debate Sunday in Manchester, N.H., former US Sen. John Edwards of North Carolina led the charge in criticizing front-runners Hillary Rodham Clinton and Barack Obama for showing insufficient leadership on ending the war in Iraq. The candidates also weighed in on dealing with Iran's nuclear ambitions and ending the bloodshed in Darfur. New Hampshire hosts the country's first 2008 primary.

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