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A Rope and a Prayer: A Kidnapping From Two Sides

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David Rohde, a journalist who won a 1996 Pulitzer Prize while reporting from Bosnia for the Monitor, first traveled to Little America in 2004 to find many of the same cookie-cutter American homes still standing, albeit insulated by high protective walls. Rohde’s fascination with continued American involvement in Afghanistan became the topic of his intended book, one that sought to answer the pressing question: Can religious extremism be countered?

In an effort to ensure that his book would not become “superficial and out-of-date” Rohde scheduled an interview with a Taliban commander through an Afghan intermediary, hoping to obtain the enemy perspective. Rohde got much more than he bargained for. On Nov. 10, 2008, the very man he intended to interview kidnapped Rohde; his interpreter, Tahir; and his driver, Asad.

A Rope and a Prayer: A Kidnapping From Two Sides continues with alternating chapters by Rohde (who was also held captive by Bosnian Serbs while reporting for the Monitor) recounting the tedium and hopelessness of what became a seven-month sojourn in Pashtun country, and by his wife, Kristen Mulvihill, who details the efforts taken to secure her husband’s release.

The dual story is the gem of this work. Rohde shares the unlikely moments of happiness among captors and captured: the palpable camaraderie after finishing a grueling overnight hike to a safe house; the guard who brings Rohde English-language newspapers from the market so he can stay abreast of world affairs. In bleak circumstances, small gestures have great effect, and are never forgotten.

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