Menu
Share
Share this story
Close X
 
Switch to Desktop Site

"A Pledge to America": the latest in a long line of political protest pamphlets

(Read article summary)

(Read caption) Published in 1776, Paine’s "Common Sense" sold as many as 120,000 copies in the first three months, 500,000 in the first year, and went through 25 editions in 12 months

About these ads

Republicans unveiled their new plan to fix the country with all the fanfare of a book release. It’s got a catchy title, “A Pledge to America,” juicy bits of it were leaked by the press last night, and it was introduced at a lumberyard-cum-hardware store in Sterling, Va., a deliberately folksy, off-the-beltway venue.

And like a well-timed J.K. Rowling release, the 21-page manifesto is making its own grand entrance just as voters grow increasingly dissatisfied with Congress and Democrats’ handling of the economy – and of course, just before mid-term elections.

The pledge calls for slashing government spending, cutting taxes, and ending President Obama’s health care and economic stimulus plans.

“Regarding the policies of the current government, the governed do not consent,” the pledge states. “An arrogant and out-of-touch government of self-appointed elites makes decisions, issues mandates and enacts laws without accepting or requesting the input of the many.”

“A Pledge to America” is the latest in a long line of political pamphlets, a kissing cousin of Newt Gingrich’s 1994 "Contract with America" (still available on Amazon, perhaps enjoying revived sales), and both are descendants of the work of the great-great-grandfather of American political pamphlets, Thomas Paine.

Next

Page:   1   |   2


Follow Stories Like This
Get the Monitor stories you care about delivered to your inbox.

Loading...