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Penguin Books' First to Read program will give readers sneak peeks

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(Read caption) In order to participate in First to Read, readers must sign up for the program using either their Facebook accounts or by providing their street and e-mail addresses.

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Can’t wait another minute for that highly anticipated book release? 

If the book is being released by Penguin Group, you may not have to. Now some readers will be able to get hold of some eagerly anticipated but not-yet-published books through the publisher's new First to Read program.

Through the First to Read website, members can request an early advanced reading copy of certain titles. Readers are required to join the program, either by signing in through their Facebook account or by providing their full name, mailing address, and e-mail.

When requesting a galley, readers will be entered into a drawing, and Penguin will determine which members will receive the limited copies. However, even if a reader doesn’t get the galley, he or she will still receive access to a First to Read-only excerpt of the book.

Readers can also increase their chances of getting a galley by using points they’ve racked up for how often they use the First to Read website. Discussion on the site can include posting reviews and recommending other titles.

Advance reading copies will be offered “at least once a month,” according to the First to Read website. Right now, available titles include “The Girl You Left Behind” by Jojo Moyes, “Blood of the Lamb” by Sam Cabot, and others.

"We know people love to talk about and recommend the books they've read and are reading,” Suzie Sisoler, senior director of consumer engagement at Penguin, told industry newsletter Shelf Awareness. “And to encourage that, we've integrated social sharing throughout the site.”

In addition, Penguin wants to hear about what you're reading through their program. First to Read is part of "ongoing efforts to increase book discoverability and engage with readers," the publisher said, according to Shelf Awareness.

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