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J.K. Rowling announces sequel to 'The Cuckoo's Calling' (+video)

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(Read caption) J.K. Rowling may not be happy with her pairings in the Harry Potter universe, but it looks like she's been writing to make up for it. The author has revealed that her second novel under her Robert Galbraith pseudonym will be in stores at the end of June. Her second novel, titled 'The Silkworm,' centers around her characters from 'The Cuckoo's Calling', Cormoran Strike & his assistant Robin Ellacott, where they investigate the disappearance of a vindictive novelist.
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J.K. Rowling will be releasing a sequel to the mystery novel “The Cuckoo’s Calling,” which was published this April under the pseudonym of Robert Galbraith.

It was discovered this summer that the “Harry Potter” author was actually the writer behind the mystery.

Now Rowling says a new novel following the exploits of detective Cormoran Strike and his secretary Robin, titled “The Silkworm,” will be released this June.

According to the novel’s publisher, Little, Brown, “Silkworm” will find Strike hired to investigate the disappearance of writer Owen Quine. His wife, who hires Strike, believes Owen has simply left for a few days and wants Strike to locate him, but the detective soon discovers that Quine’s whereabouts aren’t quite so easily solved and that the writer recently finished a book that contains thinly veiled and nasty versions of just about all his acquaintances.

“Cuckoo” became an instant bestseller after the real author was revealed (against Rowling’s wishes – a lawyer at the firm for which she was a client told a friend and the author sued him). Many publications didn’t review the book until after it was discovered that Rowling was the author, but most gave “Cuckoo” positive reviews, with New York Times critic Michiko Kakutani calling the book “a highly entertaining book that’s way more fun and way more involving than Ms. Rowling’s sluggish 2012 novel, ‘The Casual Vacancy’” and praising Cormoran Strike as “an appealing protagonist.”

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