Menu
Share
Share this story
Close X
 
Switch to Desktop Site

Immigrants gaining jobs, native-born Americans aren't

Since the recession's end in June 2009, legal and illegal immigrants posted a net gain of 656,000 jobs, while native-born Americans lost 1.2 million, says a Pew Hispanic Center report.

Jobseekers meet potential employers recruiting during the Women Job Fairs in New York, on Oct. 21. Since the recession's end in June 2009 in the United States, immigrants have seen job growth but native-born workers have continued to lose jobs.

Bebeto Matthews/AP

About these ads

In the year since the official end of recesson in the United States, immigrants have seen job growth but native-born workers have continued to lose jobs.

That's the politically explosive conclusion of an analysis released Friday by the Pew Hispanic Center, a nonpartisan research group funded by the Pew Charitable Trusts.

The report, coming in the final days of an election campaign centered around the weak economy and job market, focuses on both the recession and its immediate aftermath. Among the top conclusions:

• In the year following the official end of the Great Recession in June 2009, foreign-born workers posted a net gain of 656,000 jobs, while native-born workers lost 1.2 million. The foreign-born category includes legal and illegal immigrants.

• As a result of immigrants' recent job gains, the unemployment rate for immigrant workers fell during this period from 9.3 percent to 8.7 percent, while for native-born workers it rose from 9.2 percent to 9.7 percent. For both groups, unemployment remains far above where it stood before the recession.

• Although immigrants have been finding employment, the poor job-market conditions have pushed average wages down. Median weekly earnings of foreign-born workers fell 4.5 percent from mid-2009 to mid-2010, compared with a decline of less than 1 percent for native-born workers.

"It might be that ... immigrants were more accepting of lower wages and reduced hours because many, especially unauthorized immigrants, are not eligible for unemployment benefits," Pew center researcher Rakesh Kochhar writes, along with co-authors of the study.

Next

Page:   1   |   2   |   3


Follow Stories Like This
Get the Monitor stories you care about delivered to your inbox.

Loading...