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Why Time Warner is spinning off magazine unit

Spinning off its magazine company into a separate entity will give Time Warner freedom to focus on TV and movies, explained the company's CEO in a statement released Wednesday. Shareholders have urged the move as increasing internet advertising challenged the magazine business in recent years.

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This 2008 file photo shows President Barack Obama featured in a special issue of Time Magazine on a New York newsstand. Time Warner Inc. on Wednesday said that it will spin off the magazine unit into a separate, publicly traded company by the end of the year.

AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File

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Time Warner Inc. said Wednesday that it will spin off the magazine unit behind Time, Sports Illustrated and People into a separate, publicly traded company by the end of the year, ending a media marriage that has lasted more than two decades.

CEO Jeff Bewkes said in a statement Wednesday that the decision to split off the Time Inc. magazine company will give Time Warner "strategic clarity" and enable it to focus on its TV networks including TNT, HBO and CNN, and its Warner Bros. studio, which produces movies and TV shows.

He said the move would create value for shareholders, similar to the company's previous spin-offs of Time Warner Cable and AOL.

 
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