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My long love affair with Monitor journalism

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As a schoolboy in Britain, I witnessed the end of Nazi fascism in Europe; as a journalist, the waning of communism and the emerging conflict with Islamist extremism. A lot of misery is behind us, but wars and man’s inhumanity to man still abound. However, the most dramatic movement of our times is the march of freedom through Eastern Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America, and now the Arab world. 

Since 1908, national and international affairs have been chronicled, interpreted, and appraised by this remarkable newspaper launched by a remarkable woman, Mary Baker Eddy.

Founder of the Christian Science Church, she wrote that the Monitor’s purpose was “to injure no man, but to bless all mankind.” That does not mean seeing the world through rose-tinted glasses. Where there is evil, the Monitor reports it. But the Monitor is intent on solutions and healing rather than despair.

Technology has transformed my profession of journalism. The printed newspaper is in eclipse and electronic delivery of news is instant and pervasive. The circulation of the daily print Monitor, once reaching more than 200,000 subscribers, has dwindled, and it is now a weekly magazine. But in March, the Monitor, with its website, CSMonitor.com, reached an audience of 10.3 million via the Internet.

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