Menu
Share
 
Switch to Desktop Site

America's young 2012 Olympians are its future

Gymnast Gabby Douglas, runner Galen Rupp, the women's 400-meter relay team: America got a clear glimpse of its bright future at the 2012 Olympics as 'Millennial Generation' Olympians exhibited their unique take on the country’s traditional pride, diversity, and can-do spirit.

Image

US women's relay team members from left, Sanya Richards-Ross, Francena McCorory, Allyson Felix, and Deedee Trotter wear their national flag after their gold medal win in the 4 x 400-meter relay at the 2012 Olympics in London Aug. 11. Op-ed contributors Morley Winograd and Michael D. Hais write: 'Millennial pride-in-country rarely, if ever, became bragging jingoism when Americans won or sour grapes when they lost.'

Martin Meissner/AP

About these ads

America got a clear glimpse of its bright future at the 2012 Olympics as the “Millennial Generation” Olympians exhibited their unique take on the country’s traditional pride, diversity, and can-do spirit.

Millennials (Americans born in 1982 through 2003) comprised the bulk of the US team that averaged 27 years of age. Their generation’s focus on the success of the larger group was evident in these ways during the competition: 

Patriotism without jingoism. Millennials’ pride in their country, without excessive nationalism, was constantly on display in London. A 2011 Pew survey indicated that 70 percent of Millennials describe themselves as “very patriotic,” but only a third said that the United States is the “greatest country in the world.” That contrasts strikingly with two-thirds of senior citizens and half of baby boomers who think America is the best.

Each member of the gold-medal winning US women’s 400-meter relay team wrapped herself in her own American flag and beamed at the scoreboard showing the team’s world-record time, each expressing her pride in competing and winning for the USA. The contrast with the two American Baby Boomer medal winners in the 1968 Mexico City Olympics, who raised their fists in a black-power salute as the national anthem played, couldn’t have been greater.

But, Millennial pride-in-country rarely, if ever, became bragging jingoism when Americans won or sour grapes when they lost. Instead, US athletes seemed to appreciate and applaud the efforts of their competitors.

Next

Page:   1   |   2   |   3


Follow Stories Like This
Get the Monitor stories you care about delivered to your inbox.

Loading...