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US manufacturing is key to competitiveness

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But there is some good news: US manufacturing. Until recently, the industry had been in steady decline, but many signs now indicate that America is now in the midst of a historic manufacturing revival. But manufacturers are also facing a skills-gap, as workers are unprepared for the demands of this growing industry. Preparing tomorrow’s skilled workforce should be one of the Obama administration’s top economic priorities. Developing a long-term plan to train workers for new manufacturing jobs is vital to boosting US competitiveness.

There are several reasons for the growth in US manufacturing, but one of the main explanations is that outsourcing to low-cost countries is no longer as tempting as it once was. With labor and transportation costs rising in many of these countries, American companies are bringing work back to the US and foreign companies are more attracted to a cost-competitive US base as well. In addition, a natural gas boon will help make US energy costs some of the lowest in the world. Add to that the benefits of higher quality manufactured goods and state-of-the-art innovation capabilities, and the US has a fair chance of regaining its historical leadership in advanced manufacturing.

A recent study by the Boston Consulting Group claims that the US is indeed on course to regain its status as a global industrial powerhouse, suggesting that the manufacturing resurgence combined with boosting US exports could create between 2.5 million and 5 million jobs by the end of the decade. But meeting the challenges of this “manufacturing revival,” means closing the skills gap through more, and better-targeted, investment in education and training.

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