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Chile rescue of miners recalls 'better angels'

From the resilience and courage of the miners to the remarkable rescue effort 2,000 feet above them, the miner rescue proves that ingenuity and determination can triumph over a huge challenge.

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“I was with God and with the devil. And I reached out for God.”

Those were the words of Mario Sepulveda, the second miner to be freed after spending more than two months trapped underground in a collapsed mine in Chile.

At this writing, the rescue effort is proceeding smoothly, as each of the 33 miners is brought to the surface, one by one, in a two-foot-diameter cage dubbed the Phoenix. The last of the miners was expected to taste the fresh air of freedom late Wednesday evening or Thursday morning.

As the world waits, prays, and cheers on the rescue effort, it’s worth reviewing the blessings in this amazing story of ingenuity and perseverance.

They begin with the resilience, patience, and courage of the miners. These men spent their first 17 days with no contact with the surface world, unaware of what kind of rescue effort might be under way or when it might reach them.

This is believed to be the deepest rescue of trapped miners in history, and the miners are the longest to survive an underground collapse on record. They are ordinary working men, who took daily risks doing a job most people would avoid if possible.

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