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Why Egypt now deserves world's help

Helping Egypt fix its economy is now as important for the West as helping it fix its democracy. The protests that led to the military ouster of President Mohamed Morsi were driven as much by economic suffering as political anger for his undemocratic ways.

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People line up for subsidized bread at a bakery in Alexandria, Egypt. Egypt is trying to stave off a crisis in its subsided bread program as imported stocks hit historically low levels.

Reuters

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One gauge of the West’s compassion as well as its strategic interests is how easily a poor country can get a loan from the International Monetary Fund. On Thursday, for example, the West-dominated IMF gave Pakistan an initial green light for a $5.3 billion bailout. Two-thirds of Pakistan’s 180 million people live in poverty. The country is beset by terrorists and critical to Afghanistan’s future. It is, in short, a country too important to fail.

Is Egypt now also deserving of such foreign assistance?

Without quick aid, the Egyptian economy could implode, creating yet another political upheaval like that the world witnessed in the mass protests leading up to the July 3 military overthrow of President Mohamed Morsi.

As much as many Egyptians disliked Mr. Morsi’s antidemocratic behavior, they also sought his ouster because of a worsening economy as well as his focus on seeking political gain more than economic reform. Half of the country’s 80 million people are either living below the poverty line or near it. The ouster was a revolution of the hungry.

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