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Grizzly bear attacks Alaska biologist twice; biologist not upset at bear

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"As soon as I turned, he was running already. It was shoot, shoot and roll back over," Miller said.

He managed to fire two more shots, but with his right arm badly injured he thinks he missed the bear. Then he lay still as the animal gnawed and clawed at him.

"It was no problem to lay there with my neck covered and let him chew. It was actually painless at that point," Miller said.

After the second attack, Miller played dead again, lying still for three to five minutes as thoughts raced through his mind. Was the bear still around? How bad was he bleeding? Where was his gun?

He tried to move and realized he couldn't. He was too badly injured.

"I was just hoping my radio was still in my vest pocket and it was," he said. "I got it out and started radioing mayday, which nobody answered."

He tried calling for help about every 20 seconds; about 20 minutes passed before a voice came over the radio.

It was the helicopter pilot.

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Not knowing there had been a bear attack, he was calling in to let Miller know he was within 5 miles (8 kilometers) and needed to know the exact pickup spot.

"I told him what had happened. So he came in low, just doing outwardly expanding circles to make sure there was no bear around," Miller said.

Reassured the grizzly was gone, the pilot flew to the next valley and picked up geologist Ryan Campbell, who was trained as a wilderness medic.

Campbell cleaned Miller's wounds and applied pressure bandages to stem the bleeding. That's when Miller really began hurting.

"When he was cleaning out the wounds with this spray bottle ... it was a mixture of fire and electricity," Miller said.

He was flown to a nearby air strip where an emergency medical technician was waiting, then taken by medical helicopter on the more than hour-long trip to Providence Alaska Medical Center in Anchorage.

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