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Screen wars: stealing TV’s ‘eyeball’ share

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“NBC is certainly taking the right approach by stepping back and trying to look at [the Olympics] as a holistic suite of [video] offerings and then trying to figure out what pieces best go where,” says Kendall Whitehouse, senior director of information technology at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

NBC concedes that this unprecedented blanket of coverage across TV, Internet, and mobile devices amounts to a giant experiment. “I have no idea how people are going to use this stuff,” said Alan Wurtzel, the company’s research chief, in an interview with the Associated Press.

This spring and summer, deals to make video more ubiquitous across screens have popped up with more and more frequency:

Netflix, the video rent-by-mail company, has struck several new agreements to deliver its content online. A new $100 box from Roku the size of a paperback book lets users stream any of about 10,000 movies from Netflix to their TVs (though the vast majority of Netflix’s library will still be available only through DVDs by mail). South Korea’s LG Electronics announced it will offer a high-definition (HD) disc player that also will be able to access movies from Netflix via the Internet. And Microsoft will stream Netflix video to its Xbox 360 videogame consoles.

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