Menu
Share
Share this story
Close X
 
Switch to Desktop Site

Digging down to family roots

Next Previous

Page 2 of 5

About these ads

The NBC show features celebrities such as Rosie O'Donnell, who discovered a long-lost branch of her family, or Steve Buscemi, who learned of an ancestor who was a deserter in the Civil War.

In addition, Harvard University professor Henry Louis Gates has done genealogical research through two TV programs tracing the history of notable African-Americans and a second program last year called "Faces of America," tracing the genealogy of prominent Americans. Professor Gates learned, for instance, that he has more than 50 percent European ancestry, far more than he ever thought.

"Genealogy has exploded," says James Sweany, head of the local history and genealogy reading room at the Library of Congress.

The National Archives in Washington, D.C., recently hosted its seventh annual genealogy fair. Seven years ago, says Diane Dimkoff, director of customer services for the archives, 700 people attended the first fair. This year, nearly 5,400 visitors came.

Ancestry.com, a company that allows visitors to create a family tree free of charge, now has 24 million family trees on its website. "Literally billions of records have been put online in the last couple of years," says Josh Hanna, executive vice president and general manager of Ancestry.com.

Next Previous

Page 2 of 5


Follow Stories Like This
Get the Monitor stories you care about delivered to your inbox.

Loading...