Menu
Share
Share this story
Close X
 
Switch to Desktop Site

Judge creates unique problem-solving court to help unwed parents

A Minnesota judge creates unique problem-solving court to help unwed parents struggling to deal with the financial and emotional burdens of raising a child. The innovative Co-Parent Court aims to take place the focus on the well-being of the child.

Image

A Minnesota judge creates unique problem-solving court to help unwed parents struggling to deal with the financial and emotional burdens of raising a child. The innovative Co-Parent Court aims to take place the focus on the well-being of the child. Child support issues can get heated. In this file photo, fathers protest their treatment by the court system in cases of child custody and child support in 2001.

Melanie Stetson Freeman / The Christian Science Monitor

About these ads

Bruce Peterson noticed a problem as he sat on the bench of Hennepin County Family Court. The young men who showed up for paternity establishment and child support hearings looked to be facing shaky futures with their children.

"We were telling young dads, 'Congratulations, you're the father legally now, here's your child support obligation,' " Judge Peterson said.

The focus was on money, not on the role the fathers might play in their children's lives.

"It was very apparent to me there was much more work to be done to support these young parents in their parenting obligations towards their children and to each other," Peterson said.

Unlike divorce cases, where the couple may have known each other a long time and have a shared history, never-married parents who show up in Peterson's courtroom may not know each other well. And they now have an 18-year shared endeavor: raising a child. Often, they have little education or job prospects.

Most parents are together at the birth of a child, Peterson said, but the fall-off of father involvement is steep. "By age 5, over one-third of children with unmarried parents have lost track of the fathers entirely, and over half have very limited contact with their fathers," Peterson said. "That's a large group of children that just isn't getting these demonstrated benefits of positive father involvement."

In 2010, Peterson and a team of partners created the Co-Parent Court using federal, county and foundation money. Similar to drug courts and DWI courts created in the 1990s to address recurring problems in the criminal justice system, Co-Parent Court is the county's first problem-solving court in the family court arena, Minnesota Public Radio reports.

Next

Page:   1   |   2   |   3


Follow Stories Like This
Get the Monitor stories you care about delivered to your inbox.

Loading...