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Republican kids: When partisan politics stretch parent-child bonds

Republican kids and Democrat parents: the strains of partisan politics in Washington can be mimicked at home if a child comes home with different political views than Mom and Dad.

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A Republican son and Democrat dad, like Jake Wagner and his father Peter of Buffalo, N.Y., can cause friction at home when political views clash.

Courtesy of Peter Wagner/AP

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When David Burrows took on Barry Goldwater and Ayn Rand as "mentors" at age 14, his parents wanted to know what else he was doing that they might be ashamed of.

Andrew LaGrone's grandmother was an Edmund Muskie delegate at the Democratic National Convention in 1972 and was stunned when Andrew became a Republican at 19.

Growing up in Buffalo, Jake Wagner's dad assumed he'd be a Democrat. NOT.

While young people have gone "liberal" on their conservative parents for decades, teen crossovers to the GOP are more of a rarity. How do parental Dems and their Republican kids manage the familial bond when partisan politics are on the line?

As the Republican National Convention got off to a slow start Monday in Tampa, Fla., President Barack Obama continues his effort to get young people to the polls. Mr. Obama leads Mitt Romney 54 percent to 38 percent among voters younger than 35, according to the latest Associated Press-GfK poll.

No matter. The 21-year-old LaGrone in Nebraska and 19-year-old Wagner in New Hampshire are staying busy marshaling campus support for the Romney-Ryan ticket as they looked back on where it all began. Burrows, 50 and living in his hometown of Dallas, has lost both his parents, but he remembers their reaction to his Republican awakening like it was yesterday.

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