Switch to Desktop Site
 
 

E-cigarettes gain popularity with kids

Electronic cigarettes are becoming increasingly popular with children, sparking concerns from health officials that the smokeless cigarettes could serve as a gateway to regular tobacco products.

Image

Gabor Kovacs of 'smoke no smoke' displays e-cigarette flavor attachments that his shop sells in Camden in London, June 9, 2013. Children – like adults – are increasingly trying electronic cigarettes, according to the first large national study to gauge use by middle and high school students. About 2 percent of the students said they’d used an e-cigarette in the previous month, according to a survey done in 2012. That was up from 1 percent in 2011.

AP Photo/Ed Andrieski

About these ads

Children – like adults – are increasingly trying electronic cigarettes, according to the first large national study to gauge use by middle and high school students.

About 2 percent of the students said they'd used an e-cigarette in the previous month, according to a survey done last year. That was up from 1 percent in 2011.

More kids still smoke traditional cigarettes than the new electronic ones, and it's not clear how dangerous e-cigarettes are. It's also not clear from the report how many are using them on a daily or weekly basis.

But health officials are worried. The new study suggests many kids are now getting a first taste of nicotine through e-cigarettes and then moving on to regular tobacco products, they say.

Electronic cigarettes are battery-powered devices that provide users with aerosol puffs that typically contain nicotine, and sometimes flavorings like fruit, mint or chocolate. They've often been described as a less dangerous alternative to regular cigarettes.

Unlike conventional smokes, the federal government does not yet regulate e-cigarettes, although more than 20 states have banned store sales to minors. The devices began to appear in the United States in late 2006, but marketing has exploded in the last couple of years.

Next

Page:   1   |   2   |   3

Share