Switch to Desktop Site
 
 

Senate rejects the House stop-gap spending bill. Is a government shutdown avoidable?

With near permanent brinksmanship the new normal, Congress headed into votes Friday to try to avert a government shutdown that is slated to occur on Oct. 1 if a continuing resolution bill is not passed.

Image

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev.,talks with Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., center, and Senate Majority Whip Richard Durbin of Ill., following a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, to discuss FEMA funding and the continuing resolution to fund the government.

Harry Hamburg/AP

About these ads

[This story has been updated at 1:50 p.m. to accurately reflect late breaking developments.]

The Senate has voted to reject the temporary spending bill passed by the House late last night.

With near permanent brinksmanship the new normal, Congress headed into votes Friday to try to avert a government shutdown that is slated to occur on Oct. 1 if a continuing resolution bill is not passed.

In a surprise late night victory Thursday, House Republican leaders narrowly passed a stop-gap spending bill to fund government through Nov. 18.

As threatened, the Senate rejected the House bill on a bipartisan vote, 59 to 36. Senate leaders agreed to a vote on a Senate version of the bill on Monday – but only after a “cooling off period.”

“[Leaders] should just cool off a little bit and work through this,” said Senate majority leader Harry Reid (D) of Nevada, speaking on the floor after Friday’s midday vote.

“There is a compromise before us,” he added. “The government is not going to shut down.”

None of this was expected to be controversial. Congress last month voted on a funding level for the new fiscal year as part of a deal to raise the national debt limit. The continuing resolution (CR) that GOP leaders brought to the floor on Wednesday set a rate of spending for fiscal year 2012 consistent with that agreement.

But House Republicans opposed to the debt-ceiling deal saw the CR vote as a fresh opportunity to make a stand. Conservatives said that the $1.043 trillion spending level for fiscal year 2012 – as mandated in the debt-limit deal – was too high.

Next

Page:   1   |   2   |   3


Follow Stories Like This
Get the Monitor stories you care about delivered to your inbox.

Share

Loading...