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Syria becomes high-stakes gamble for Obama, Congress

Syria is likely to color if not define the rest of President Obama's last term in office – and beyond that, his presidential legacy. In Congress, lawmakers now must assume co-ownership of US foreign policy in this most difficult and contentious part of the world.

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President Barack Obama arrives to make a statement about Syria in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington, Saturday. Delaying what had appeared to be an imminent strike, Obama abruptly announced that he will seek congressional approval before launching any military action.

Charles Dharapak/AP

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The civil war in Syria has become a high-stakes political gamble for President Obama and for the United States Congress.

For the President, whatever happens in coming days as lawmakers return from their summer break to debate Obama’s plan to attack the regime of President Bashar al-Assad is likely to color if not define the rest of his last term in office – and beyond that, his presidential legacy.

For Congress – especially the Republican-led House – getting what they wanted on Syria will not be a walk in the park. Voting “yea” or “nay,” lawmakers now must assume co-ownership of US foreign policy in this most difficult and contentious part of the world at a time when the ghost of Iraq hovers about and most Americans are highly skeptical of anything that could involve them in another war.

 
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