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Why the Penn State sex abuse saga could go on for years (+video)

The FBI is investigating whether Penn State football coach Jerry Sandusky broke federal law in sexually abusing boys. The university faces civil suits seeking compensation for Sandusky's victims.

Jerry Sandusky Found Guilty
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The trial and guilty verdict of former Penn State defensive coach Jerry Sandusky took exactly two weeks, but the saga is nowhere close to an end.

Not only do his attorneys plan to mount an appeal, but Mr. Sandusky, the university, and top school administrators also face additional legal battles that are expected to stretch on for years.

A jury in Bellefonte, Pa. deliberated for 21 hours over two days before delivering a verdict late Friday, finding Sandusky guilty on 45 of the 48 counts against him involving sexual abuse of 10 boys over a 15-year period. He will likely face a sentence of life in prison.

IN PICTURES: Fallout from the Penn State scandal

Legal experts say the overwhelming number of accusers and evidence, ranging from love letters Sandusky penned to an eyewitness testimony to the abuse, were too much of a hurdle for the defense to overcome. They helped establish a narrative that Sandusky was a predatory pedophile who used a charity he founded to help at-risk children to groom victims, and the high-powered athletic culture he existed in helped enable the abuse over years.

Sandusky did not testify; instead surrogates vouched for his character and questioned the motives of the prosecution witnesses. The rare times the public heard his side of the story were two media interviews he gave shortly following his November 2011 arrest in which he gave meandering answers to questions related to his relationship with children.

Daniel Filler, a law professor at Drexel University in Philadelphia and a former public defender in Pennsylvania, says “the only hope Sandusky had was to testify” but the media appearance doomed that opportunity.

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