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JPMorgan Chase's Dimon survives pay, chairmanship votes (+video)

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Most large American companies combine the jobs of chairman and CEO, but shareholders have pushed in recent years to separate them. About one in five Standard & Poor's 500 companies separate the jobs.

Supporters argue that an independent chairman can provide a check on the CEO's power. Shareholders also frequently push for separation at turbulent times for a company.

In JPMorgan's case, the move to separate the jobs was put on the ballot before the $2 billion loss was unearthed. It was also on the ballot last year, but it received far less support then, 12 percent.

JPMorgan stock climbed throughout the morning and was up 3 percent by midday, on a day when the broader stock market was up only slightly. Investors pummeled JPMorgan stock in the first two trading days after the loss was revealed, driving it down 12 percent and wiping out almost $20 billion in market value.

Dimon said he did not expect the trading loss to jeopardize JPMorgan's quarterly stock dividend, which is 30 cents per share.

A law enforcement official said that the FBI's New York office is heading an inquiry by the Justice Department into the JPMorgan loss. The official, who was not authorized to speak about the decision, spoke on condition of anonymity.

The official characterized the inquiry as preliminary.

There was a heavy police presence at the meeting, in an office park east of downtown Tampa. Protesters were there as well, including some who threw eggs at a poster with Dimon's picture on it.

"We wanted to let Jamie Dimon know how we feel about what big banks have done to our economy," said Marilyn Lyday, a member of the protest group Occupy Orlando.

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