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What will happen if Congress remains status quo?

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No matter who wins the presidency — President Barack Obama or Republican Mitt Romney — the nation's chief executive will be dealing with a Congress no closer to bridging the ideological chasm and showing no inclination to end the months of dysfunction. Tea party numbers are certain to tick up in the Senate with Republican Ted Cruz heavily favored in Texas and Deb Fischer looking to grab the Nebraska seat.

In the House, the movement that propelled the GOP to the majority in 2010 will be even more emboldened even if a few of the big-name tea partiers lose.

Sal Russo, head of the Tea Party Express, likened the group to the anti-Vietnam War movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s that he said remade the Democratic Party. He envisions the same with the GOP.

"In the sense that the anti-war movement brought out millions of people that had not been involved in politics and they became engaged in a material way," Russo said in an interview as he headed to what he expects will be a victory party for Cruz in Texas.

The Democratic Party, he insists, has never been the same and neither will the GOP after the influx of tea partiers.

When the Senate votes are counted, moderate Republicans and Democrats from Massachusetts and Montana could be gone, leaving the chamber with just a handful of the lawmakers inclined to reach across the aisle. Republican Sen. Olympia Snowe of Maine decided to retire earlier this year, frustrated with the partisan gridlock in Congress.

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