Switch to Desktop Site
 
 

Sandy Hook: Police say shooter forced his way into school

Police said Saturday they had found "very good evidence" they hoped would answer questions about the motives of the gunman, described as brilliant but remote, who forced his way into the Sandy Hook school, killing 26 children and adults in one of the world's worst mass shootings.

Image

A woman comforts a young girl during a vigil service for victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary shooting Friday evening at St. Rose of Lima Roman Catholic Church in Newtown, Conn.

Andrew Gombert/AP

About these ads

Police said Saturday they had found "very good evidence" they hoped would answer questions about the motives of the 20-year-old gunman, described as brilliant but remote, who forced his way into a U.S. school and killed 26 children and adults in one of the world's worst mass shootings.

Witnesses said the gunman, Adam Lanza, didn't say a word as he shot children as young as 5 years old and later killed himself. The bodies of victims were still inside the school for some time Saturday morning, and authorities prepared to release their names later in the day.

Reaction was swift and emotional around the world, and many immediately thought of Dunblane — a 1996 shooting in that small Scottish town which killed 16 small children and prompted a campaign that ultimately led to tighter gun controls.

Pressure to take similar action built on President Barack Obama, whose comments on the tragedy were one of the most outwardly emotional moments of his presidency.

"The majority of those who died were children – beautiful little kids between the ages of 5 and 10 years old," Obama told a White House news briefing. He paused for several seconds to keep his composure and wiped an eye. Nearby, two aides cried and held hands.

Sandy Hook shooting: Stories of heroism, ways to help

Next

Page 1 of 6

Share