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Blizzard warnings: Cars stranded, power out in central US

Earlier, blizzard warnings extended from the Oklahoma and Texas panhandles into south-central Kansas. The blizzard warnings have been dropped for the far western panhandles.

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Cattle stand in blizzard conditions in Lubbock, Texas, Monday, Feb. 25. State troopers are unable to respond to calls for assistance and National Guard units are mobilizing as a winter storm blankets the central Plains. The blizzard, labeled a 'cattle-killer,' has already claimed two human lives.

Zach Long / Lubbock Avalanche-Journal / AP

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The nation's midsection again dealt with blizzard conditions Monday, closing highways, knocking out power to thousands in Texas and Oklahoma and even bringing hurricane-force winds to the Texas Panhandle. Two people have died.

The storm is being blamed for two deaths on Monday. In northwest Kansas, a 21-year-old man's SUV hit an icy patch on Interstate 70 and overturned. And in the northwest town of Woodward, Okla., heavy snow caused a roof to collapse, killing one inside the home.

Earlier on Monday, blizzard warnings extended from the Oklahoma and Texas panhandles into south-central Kansas. The blizzard warnings were dropped Monday evening for the far western portion of the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles.

Already under a deep snowpack from last week's storm, Kansas was preparing for another round of heavy snow Monday evening and overnight, prompting some to wonder what it could do for the drought.

"Is it a drought-buster? Absolutely not," National Weather Service meteorologist Victor Murphy said. "Will it bring short-term improvement? Yes."

As many as 10,000 people lost power in Oklahoma, as did thousands more in Texas.

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