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FBI didn't tell Boston about Tsarnaev warning, says police chief

The FBI didn't tell Boston police that they'd been warned about Tamerlan Tsarnaev, despite FBI-Boston PD collaborations, Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis told Congress today.

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Boston Police Commissioner Edward Davis testifies before the House Homeland Security Committee at a hearing on "The Boston Bombings: A First Look," on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, May 9, 2013. Former Sen. Joeseph Lieberman, I-Conn., sits at left, and photos of those who were killed at the Boston Marathon bombing are at right. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Susan Walsh / AP

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The FBI did not initially share with Boston police the warnings it had received from Russia about one suspect in last month's marathon bombings, despite the work of four city police representatives on a federal terrorism task force, Boston's police commissioner told Congress on Thursday.

Yet Commissioner Ed Davis acknowledged that police might not have uncovered or disrupted the plot even if they had fully investigated the family of Tamerlan Tsarnaev based on those warnings. The FBI after a cursory investigation closed its assessment on Tsarnaev, who died in a police shootout after the bombings. Boston police learned about the Russian security service warnings only later.

"That's very hard to say. We would certainly look at the information, we would certainly talk to the individual," Davis said. "From the information I've received, the FBI did that, and they closed the case out. I can't say that I would have come to a different conclusion based upon the information that was known at that particular time."

 
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