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Mayor Bloomberg: De Blasio's bid a 'class-warfare campaign'

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg implied Bill de Blasio, the leading Democratic candidate running to replace him as mayor, was using his interracial family and his rhetoric of New York as 'two cities' to gain the support of minority voters.

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Chirlane McCray, the wife of New York mayoral candidate Bill de Blasio (r.), waves after being introduced while attending a campaign rally with their daughter Chiara (center) in Brooklyn, New York Saturday. Mayor Michael Bloomberg said the Democratic front-runner to succeed him as mayor is waging a "class warfare and racist" campaign, according to an interview published on New York Magazine's website on Saturday.

Darren Ornitz/Reuters

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New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg said in an interview that one leading Democrat vying to replace him is running a "racist" campaign based on "class warfare."

Bloomberg made the comment about candidate Bill de Blasio in an interview with New York magazine due on newsstands Monday. It appeared on the magazine's website Saturday.

De Blasio is white, but he has been polling well among blacks since he began airing television ads featuring his interracial family. His wife is black and the couple has a son and a daughter. De Blasio has also criticized Bloomberg as not doing enough for the poor, saying New York has become "two cities," one for the rich and one for everyone else.

In asking Bloomberg about the mayor's race, the interviewer calls de Blasio's bid "in some ways ... a class-warfare campaign." Bloomberg interjects, "class-warfare and racist," according to the magazine.

Asked to explain what makes de Blasio's campaign racist, Bloomberg responded, "Well, no, no, I mean he's making an appeal using his family to gain support. I think it's pretty obvious to anyone watching what he's been doing. I do not think he himself is racist. It's comparable to me pointing out I'm Jewish in attracting the Jewish vote."

Bloomberg, a self-made billionaire, said he also found de Blasio's "two cities" rhetoric divisive.

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