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Seven days left: Is super committee ball now in Democrats' court?

Following a GOP proposal on the deficit-cutting 'super committee' to raise tax revenues, Republicans say it's the Democrats' turn to show they're serious by making cuts in entitlement spending.

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Microphones and tape recorders reach out for comments by Super committee member Sen. John Kerry (D) of Massachusetts, after he and other Democratic members of the deficit-cutting 'super committee' finished a closed-door meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday.

J. Scott Applewhite/AP

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With less than seven full days left before its deadline, the deficit-cutting “super committee” appears to be at an impasse, now focusing on how far Democrats are willing to go to roll back entitlement spending.

The six Republicans on the 12-member deficit-reduction committee have already offered what they say amounts to $250 billion in increased tax revenues – a risky political move because it violates an antitax pledge that most GOP lawmakers have signed. Now, they say, it’s time for Democrats to take comparable political risks on entitlements.

But for Democrats, support for entitlements is as much of a litmus test as tax cuts are for Republicans, and the super committee Democrats’ rank-and-file colleagues, as well as powerful outside groups, are turning on the heat to resist entitlement cuts.

So far, the Democrats don’t appear to be budging. Sen. Patty Murray (D) of Washington, who cochairs the panel, said Thursday that Democrats are still waiting for Republicans to make further concessions on revenue, or tax hikes.

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