Switch to Desktop Site
 
 

Religious freedom no match for Washington gridlock?

US Commission for International Religious Freedom, created in 1998, will cease to exist Friday unless lawmakers renew funding. Its aim: make religious freedom a priority of US foreign policy.

About these ads

Congress is poised to let the government commission that promotes international religious freedom die for lack of funding – even as concern rises about persecution of Christians in Egypt, marginalization of moderate Muslims in Pakistan, and repression of Buddhist monks in Myanmar (Burma).

The US Commission for International Religious Freedom (USCIRF) is preparing to go out of business at the end of the week after having watched various proposals for extending its funding come and go in recent months.

If no budget is voted by Friday, the commission established by Congress in 1998 to help make religious freedom a priority in US foreign policy will cease to exist.

The timing might seem odd, given the current presidential campaign in which international religious freedom – often an under-the-radar issue – is getting more that the usual attention. Republican Party caucuses and primaries are about to take place in states where the issue is more than an afterthought.

The commission, a model for other countries looking to safeguard religious freedom, is imperiled by disagreements about how the commission’s members are appointed, as well as Congress's general difficulty in approving any kind of spending measure.

Next

Page:   1   |   2   |   3

Share