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President Obama's economic speech at Georgetown

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This is the situation we confronted on the day we took office.  And so our most urgent task has been to clear away the wreckage, repair the immediate damage to the economy, and do everything we can to prevent a larger collapse.  And since the problems we face are all working off each other to feed a vicious economic downturn, we’ve had no choice but to attack all fronts of our economic crisis at once.

The first step was to fight a severe shortage of demand in the economy.  The Federal Reserve did this by dramatically lowering interest rates last year in order to boost investment.  And my administration and Congress boosted demand by passing the largest recovery plan in our nation’s history.  It’s a plan that is already in the process of saving or creating 3.5 million jobs over the next two years. It is putting money directly in people’s pockets with a tax cut for 95% of working families that is now showing up in paychecks across America. And to cushion the blow of this recession, we also provided extended unemployment benefits and continued health care coverage to Americans who have lost their jobs through no fault of their own.

Now, some have argued that this recovery plan is a case of irresponsible government spending; that it is somehow to blame for our long-term deficit projections, and that the federal government should be cutting instead of increasing spending right now.  So let me tackle this argument head on.

To begin with, economists on both the left and right agree that the last thing a government should do in the middle of a recession is to cut back on spending.  You see, when this recession began, many families sat around their kitchen table and tried to figure out where they could cut back.  So do many businesses.  That is a completely responsible and understandable reaction.  But if every family in America cuts back, then no one is spending any money, which means there are more layoffs, and the economy gets even worse.  That’s why the government has to step in and temporarily boost spending in order to stimulate demand.  And that’s exactly what we’re doing right now.

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