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More religious Americans support gay marriage than a decade ago, survey finds (+video)

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(Read caption) Support for gay marriage has surged in the United States in the decade since it first became legal in Massachusetts, with just over half of Americans now supporting the idea, according to a survey released on Wednesday.
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Public support for gay marriage may have reached a tipping point, even among religious Americans, who have been traditionally opposed to the idea.

Ten years ago, roughly one-third of Americans supported gay marriage, according to the Pew Research Center’s 2003 survey on homosexuality. Today, 53 percent of Americans say they believe gay and lesbian couples should be allowed to marry, according to a new survey conducted by the Public Religion Research Institute in Washington.

The latest poll illustrates “a fairly remarkable shift” in attitudes, PRRI chief executive Robert Jones said during a conference call with Reuters. “As public opinion goes, we really rarely see this kind of movement on any issue over a decade’s time.”

While more than half of Americans currently favor a universal right to marry, the data show that levels of support vary drastically by region, state, generation, and education level. That probably does not come as a surprise to those following the embittered battles surrounding gay marriage in Utah, Virginia, and Michigan, among other states. But what is surprising is that religion seems to play a much smaller role than it did a decade ago in how individuals decide where they stand on gay marriage.

Ten years ago, whether or not an individual subscribed to a major religion was a relatively good indicator of their stance on gay marriage: Believers resoundingly rejected the idea that the right to marry should be extended to gay and lesbian couples, while an overwhelming majority of religiously unaffiliated Americans supported a universal right, the PRRI report states. Over the past 10 years, support has grown among practitioners of every religion included in the both the 2003 Pew survey and the 2013 PRRI report.

Here are details about religious Americans' views as presented in the PRRI report, which made comparisons with views from a decade ago by drawing on the 2003 Pew survey:

Not only are more congregants breaking away from their religion’s sanctioned position on gay marriage, but some are actually leaving because of it. The researchers found that nearly one-third of Millennials who left their childhood faith reported that negative views on homosexuality fueled their desire to leave.

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While the gap between the religious and nonreligious has narrowed drastically, new divisions have become more pronounced. The gay-marriage rift between Republicans and Democrats, for instance, has intensified over the years as more Democrats than Republicans have come around to the idea.

The generational divide also remains quite pronounced, especially between Republican Millennials and members of older generations.

“It is difficult to overstate the effect age has on support for same-sex marriage,” the report states. “Even among groups that strongly oppose same-sex marriage, there are significant generational gaps.”

Among other findings in the new report:

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