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Pakistan flood aid: millions pledged, but it's still not enough

Pakistan flood aid is nowhere near the billions needed to deal with a calamity that's swept through Pakistan, wiped out crops in the agricultural heartland, and affected some 20 million people.

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Pakistanis displaced by flooding reach to grab a bag of food aid during a distribution on the road near the flood line outside of Sukkar, in Sindh province, southern Pakistan, Tuesday, Aug. 17.

Kevin Frayer/AP

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Pakistan remains desperately short of the money it needs to cope with the huge floods that have devastated the country in the past two weeks, the United Nations warned Tuesday as the scale of the disaster continued to grow.

A government relief fund established by Pakistan's prime minister has collected just $1.4 million, a government spokesman said. The United States has provided another $76 million in cash, and other countries and international agencies have pledged about $280 million more, which will be distributed through the government, the UN and nongovernmental organizations. The World Bank is to make $900 million available.

Those amounts, however, are nowhere near the billions that are needed to deal with a calamity that's swept through more than one-fifth of Pakistan's land mass, wiped out crops in the agricultural heartland, affected more than 20 million people and has many people worrying that the government itself could collapse. The Finance Ministry has warned that the floods probably will halve the nation's projected 4.5 percent economic growth this year.

IN PICTURES: Pakistan floods

"This is probably the biggest emergency on the planet today, and we need to respond keeping that in mind," Daniel Toole, the South Asia regional director of UNICEF, said at a news conference Tuesday in Islamabad. "It's beyond what any government or any one organization can do by itself, and beyond what we can expect the Pakistani people to respond to."

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