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After Moscow attack, Russians question Putin's war on terror

Russians are asking whether the repeated ability of jihadists from the turbulent northern Caucasus to strike at will in Moscow means that the country is losing its own war on terror.

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Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin (c.) and other Cabinet members observe a minute of silence in memory of the victims of Monday's suicide bombing at Moscow's main airport, on Tuesday, Jan. 25. Putin is vowing retribution for the suicide bombing attack that killed at least 35 people in Russia's busiest airport.

Alexei Nikolsky/RIA Novosti/AP

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One day after a suicide bomber killed at least 35 people in Russia's busiest airport, Russians are asking whether the repeated ability of jihadists from the turbulent northern Caucasus to strike at will in Moscow means that the country is losing its own version of the war on terror.

A few are even voicing the previously unthinkable suggestion that Prime Minister Vladimir Putin should resign, since he is the leader most closely associated with setting policy during the decade-long cycle of terrorism and brutal security countermeasures in the seething north Caucasus.

"We should urgently change our agenda, and insist that Putin and [Interior Minister Rashid] Nurgaliev come before the Duma [parliament] to explain themselves," says Vladimir Ulas, a Duma deputy with the Communist Party, which is usually loyal to the Kremlin on security issues. "The authorities have failed in the struggle against terrorism, they can not guarantee national security, so why shouldn't we be discussing the resignation of Putin's government?"

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