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'Dr. Liza' heads a free clinic that helps Moscow's homeless and hopeless

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Tatiana, a volunteer for the past three years, describes Glinka as "a person who cannot pass by when she sees someone in trouble."

Some time ago one of Tatiana's daughters died in a car accident. The other survived but was severely injured.

"Our grief brought us together. Dr. Liza's mother was ill; my daughter was suffering. That's how we got close," she says.

"Just Help" is a private effort that doesn't receive any financial aid from the Russian government. Glinka has never asked for government aid as she appreciates her financial independence.

Although now she holds the title of executive director, she still treats patients, feeds homeless people, and listens to the problems of those in need.

The organization operates thanks to charity and the money invested by Glinka's team. She doesn't know the exact number of people helping her, but there are about seven volunteers who work on a regular basis at the organization's office.

Glinka gave up her job in the medical clinic to devote all her time to charity work and her own clinic, which costs between $10,000 and $13,000 a month to run.

All sorts of people come to the basement offices on Pyatnitskaya Street. Among them: poor retirees, homeless alcoholics who want to fight their addiction, and lonely people in trouble.

Alexandra Leonidovna is raising her four children alone. She has no money to buy food, so she decided to turn to Glinka's "Just Help" fund.

"It's a wonderful charity fund," Ms. Leonidovna says. "It's good that you get the things you really need. I don't know what I would do if the fund didn't exist."

The fund also provides help to the homeless.

Every Wednesday two cars set off from Pyatnitskaya Street to Paveletsky railway station to provide food and medical care to people who have no place to live; usually about 200 homeless people show up to take advantage of the free services.

Some find out about Glinka's fund from their friends; others read about the Wednesday lunches in a booklet given out at a nearby church.

"We hand out soap, toothpaste, medications, provide first aid. We help them ... start a normal life," Glinka says.

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