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Cut food waste to help feed the world, experts say

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One of Africa’s food waste hotspots is the Dandora rubbish dump on the outskirts of Nairobi.

The 30-acre piece of land receives 2,000 tons of solid waste every day, an uncertain share of it food waste. The presence of pigs, marabou storks, dogs, and other animals – as well as human scavengers – indicates there is plenty to eat, however.

“I have worked on this site for the past six years,” said Eunice Khasandi, a 36-year-old mother of four who scavenges waste food at the dump.

“We collect food and sell it to pig farmers on the outskirts of the city,” said Khasandi, who is one of an estimated 6,000 scavengers who visit the dump, according to the City Council of Nairobi.

The scavengers sell a 50-kilogram (110 lb.) sack of waste food for Sh200 ($2.50). If the sack contained an equivalent amount of maize meal, Kenya’s staple food, it would be enough to feed between 250 and 350 people if served with stew for lunch, nutrition experts say.

“Under normal circumstances, one kilogram (2.2 lbs.) of maize meal can feed between five and seven people,” explained Avraj Marwa, executive chef at the Sarova Panafric, a 4-star hotel in Nairobi.

Food ends up on rubbish dumps for a variety of reasons: because people buy on impulse, purchase items that are almost past their sell-by date, cook more than they can eat, or simply buy food that just never gets eaten.

The hospitality industry produces a great deal of food waste, Marwa said, trying to cater to different tastes among its clients. But many people also waste food through lack of education, he said, urging better education to limit that waste.

“We need to introduce eating etiquette lessons in African schools, at the earliest level. This can be of great benefit for the pupils, for society, and the future environment,” the chef said.

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