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Readers write: Leicester victory, hunting grizzly bears, view of nuclear weapons

Letters to the editor for the June 27, 2016 weekly magazine.

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A grizzly bear is seen near the Lamar Valley in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming in 2012.

Marc Cooke/Wolves of the Rockies/AP

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Leicester victory

Regarding the May 16 OneWeek article “Why unlikely Leicester’s on top”: The comment that the top teams in the Premier League were “rubbish” this year is gratuitous and unfair. It undermines the magnitude of Leicester City’s achievement in winning the Premier League title. Manchester City, for example, played excellent soccer this season. They reached the semifinal of the Union of European Football Associations Champions League, where they lost narrowly to Real Madrid.

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Alistair Budd

London

Hunting grizzly bears

Regarding your May 6 article “No longer endangered? Montanans prepare for grizzly bear hunt” (CSMonitor.com): Well, that didn’t take long. It took 40 years for the grizzly bear population in and near Yellowstone National Park to rebound from as few as 136 in 1975. The Yellowstone ecosystem is doing what nature does when humans stop interfering: maintaining a delicate balance that ensures the survival of a healthy number of most species.

In the face of habitat destruction and now bloodlust, it won’t be long before our majestic grizzly bears are endangered again.

PETA Foundation

Norfolk, Va.

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View of nuclear weapons

Regarding your May 10 article “No Obama apology at Hiroshima, but more Americans now say bombing was wrong” (CSMonitor.com): Since 2011, more than 300,000 Syrian civilians have been slaughtered with conventional weapons. Clearly, what concerns us with nuclear weapons and sets them apart is not the number of deaths, but rather the efficiency of the death-dealing. These are ample reasons for limiting their propagation without yielding to the view that we should castigate the scientists who led the way or the decision to use them in August 1945.

Paul Bloustein

Cincinnati