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'Ghostbusters': Paul Feig reveals what looks like the Ghostbusters' vehicle

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(Read caption) 'Ghostbusters' director Paul Feig poses for photographers backstage at CinemaCon 2013.

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“Ghostbusters” director Paul Feig keeps releasing details about the upcoming movie to eager fans. 

Mr. Feig has previously posted on Twitter about casting, including which actresses would take on the role of the four Ghostbusters (it’s Melissa McCarthy, Kristen Wiig, Kate McKinnon, and Leslie Jones) and who would be taking on the role of the Ghostbusters’ receptionist (actor Chris Hemsworth). More recently, he posted photos of what appeared to be the Ghostbusters’ costumes and proton packs, tools they use to fight spirits in the films. 

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Now Feig’s newest photo may reveal the Ghostbusters’ vehicle.

The movie is currently filming and is set to be released in summer 2016. It follows two films, both released in the 1980s, which starred Bill Murray, Harold Ramis, Dan Aykroyd, and Ernie Hudson as the Ghostbusters. 

Feig is behind the comedy hits “Bridesmaids” and “The Heat,” both of which starred Ms. McCarthy (and “Bridesmaids” also starred Ms. Wiig). He also directed McCarthy’s movie “Spy,” which was released this past June. 

In this age of social media, directors and stars can drop more hints about upcoming movies. However, the prevalence of photo- and video-taking cell phones means fans can also learn more than ever before and some directors and stars try to keep plot details about a movie as close to the vest as possible.

So far, Feig has tantalized fans with these photos but not revealed too much about the plot of the film (for example, actors such as Andy Garcia, Matt Walsh, Cecily Strong, and Michael Kenneth Williams reportedly came on board recently for the new movie, but information on who most of them are playing has been hard to come by, though reports say Mr. Garcia is portraying New York City’s mayor). 

It’s a fine line directors and stars have to walk now in terms of releasing too much or too little information. For example, some fans were angered about the campaign of secrecy surrounding the 2013 film “Star Trek Into Darkness,” in which those behind the scenes made statements that seemed to imply the film’s villain was not legendary “Trek” character Khan (it turns out it was). J.J. Abrams, the film’s director, later said, “The truth is, I think it probably would have been smarter just to say up front, ’This is who it is.’”