Menu
Share
Share this story
Close X
 
Switch to Desktop Site

Anonymous attacks Cleveland website after Ohio police shoot 12-year-old boy

The fatal shooting of a 12-year old boy in Ohio brandishing a toy gun prompted calls for new regulations on toy guns – and an attack on the Cleveland city website by a hacktivist group. 

A 12-year-old boy was fatally shot by police after brandishing what turned out to be a replica gun, triggering an investigation into his death and a legislator's call for such weapons to be brightly colored or bear special markings.

The boy, identified by the medical examiner as Tamir Rice, died from his wounds Sunday, a day after officers responded to an emergency call about someone waving a "probably fake" gun at a playground.

About these ads

Deputy Chief Ed Tomba said one officer fired twice after the boy pulled the fake weapon — which was lacking the orange safety indicator usually found on the muzzle — from his waistband but had not pointed it at police. The boy did not make any verbal threats but grabbed the replica handgun after being told to raise his hands, Tomba said.

"That's when the officer fired," he said.

The hacktivist group, Anonymous, claimed that it shut down the city of Cleveland's website in retribution for the shooting, reports The Plain Dealer

In a video message posted on YouTube, Anonymous charges that an "untrained rookie officer" shot Tamir "in cold blood," and asks why the officer did not Taser the child.

"Police of the United States you will learn in due time once anonymous has shut down your sites that we will not stand for your ignorant untrained rookie cops," the message said.

Police described the weapon as an "airsoft" type replica that resembled a semi-automatic handgun. The orange safety indicator had been removed, police said.

The two officers involved in the shooting have been placed on administrative leave, which is standard procedure. The Cleveland Plain Dealer reported that the officers are a first-year rookie and a 10-year department veteran.

About these ads

The police department has collected surveillance video and other evidence and will present it to the county prosecutor's office, the newspaper said without citing a source. It said after reviewing the evidence prosecutors will present the case to a grand jury, which will decide whether the officer was justified in using force against the boy.

An attorney for the boy's family, Timothy Kucharski, said Tamir went to the park with friends Saturday afternoon, but he did not know the details of what led to his shooting.

Jeff Follmer, president of the Cleveland Police Patrolmen's Association, said the officers were not told the caller thought the gun might be fake.

State Rep. Alice Reece, a Democrat from Cincinnati and the president of the Ohio Legislative Black Caucus, announced Sunday that she will introduce legislation requiring all BB guns, air rifles and airsoft guns sold in Ohio to be brightly colored or have prominent fluorescent strips.

"The shooting of John Crawford III devastated many people in our community and left us looking for answers," Reece said in a news release. "This bill is but one small step in addressing this tragedy and helping to prevent future deadly confrontations with someone who clearly presents little to no immediate threat or danger. With Saturday's deadly shooting of a 12-year-old in Cleveland, it is becoming crystal clear that we need this law in Ohio."

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Follow Stories Like This
Get the Monitor stories you care about delivered to your inbox.