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Some Winning Proposals

TOP high school leaders in Williamsburg debated two proposals on each issue. The winning proposals included these key points: Ethics: The federal government should fund after-school television specials on ethical issues such as cheating on tests. The Federal Communications Commission should require all radio and television stations to devote one half-hour of prime time a week to community news. Federal and state prisons and the school should create a ``scared straight'' program to teach students the consequences of breaking the law.

Voter apathy: Congress should abolish the Electoral College, simplify and standardize voter registration, and prohibit the disclosure of election results until polls are closed throughout the nation.

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Children at risk: The Department of Education should create RISK (Reaching, Instructing, and Saving Kids), a K-12 school discussion program covering topics such as self-esteem, family relations, study skills, substance abuse, and stress. High school students would be required to participate in a service class and to be peer counselors for younger students.

Accountability of the news media: Television and the press are important conduits of information, and to protect a basic American liberty, they should in no way be restricted.

The economy: To encourage US industrial growth, the federal government should provide tax incentives to companies that invest in nonmilitary research and development and to citizens who save and invest money.

The environment: Federal tax incentives should be given to industries that seek safer alternatives to garbage disposal and storing of industrial wastes. Production and exportation of chlorofluorocarbons should be banned. The fuel efficiency of automobiles should be raised by government regulation, ethanol should be used as a gasoline alternative, and funding for new research on fuels should come from a new automobile gas tax.

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