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Dates in parentheses indicate a previous review of the film in the Monitor.

SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARFS

(G, Walt Disney Home Video). The Disney dynasty of animated features began with this film's premiere in 1937. The animation is still remarkable for its smoothness and realism, though the sound quality is not up to modern standards. It is adequate, though, for this simple story of a beautiful princess who incites the jealousy of her evil stepmother, the Queen. There are '30s touches: Snow White's voice is a blend of Betty Boop and Shirley Temple; Dopey predates political correctness; and the pace is slow. The film was criticized at the time for the Queen's being a bit too wicked, but it's tame by today's standards. In the end good triumphs over evil and there's enough ``Silly Symphonies'' goofiness to tickle children of the '90s.

- Owen Thomas

THE HUDSUCKER PROXY

(PG, Warner Home Video). When the greedy board of directors at Hudsucker Industries is faced with choosing a new president, it decides to pick an imbecile - so that the stock will crash and it can buy up controlling interest. The new mail-room clerk at Hudsucker (Tim Robbins) seems to fit perfectly into the board's scheme, but his big ideas for hula hoops threaten to spoil everything. Filmmakers Joel and Ethan Coen (``Raising Arizona'') use a variety of creative, fresh comic touches. (March 15, 1994)

- Judy Nichols

THE NUTCRACKER

(G, Elektra Entertainment). If you can't get to a live performance of this holiday classic, George Balanchine's movie version may have to do. While the dancing by the New York City Ballet is oftern spellbinding and Tchaikovsky's score is lovely, sugary-sweet images and occasional special effects may disappoint those hoping for a more old-fashioned rendition. The casting of Macaulay Culkin as the Nutcracker Prince is a tip-off to the film's popularized approach; Mr. Home Alone seems out of place prancing across the floor decked out in velvet, ruffles, and ballet slippers. Emile Ardolino (``Dirty Dancing,'' ``Sister Act'') directed.

(Nov. 26, 1993)

- Jennifer Wolcott


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