Switch to Desktop Site
 
 

Letters

About these ads

Cleveland Has Shaken 'Blue-Collar' Rap

What a pleasant surprise to pick up the Monitor and see a positive headline about Cleveland: "Cleveland Turns Into 'Believeland' " (Oct. 22). There is no question the Indians have helped its image by winning the American League pennant. Still, as I read through the article, I noticed there is a reluctance to let go of some of the negative press of years gone by. It gives an impression of a grungy blue-collar town just on the fringes of success.

When I was growing up in a suburb of Cleveland, the city was known as "The Best Location in the Nation," and it still is to many of us. Even through the difficult years, when outsiders' jokes and critical commentary put the city down, Cleveland was a city with a wealth of culture and professionalism. The phrase "smokestack and lunch-bucket town on the shores of Lake Erie" shows a lack of knowledge of what Cleveland has been offering for a long time.

It bespeaks a prejudice and ignorance not characteristic of the Monitor. Just to set the record straight, while the city is experiencing a renaissance, it has for many decades been the home of the Cleveland Symphony Orchestra, top-notch museums and theaters, and many other cultural attractions. Cleveland's ethnic and cultural diversity is comparable to any city in the US.

Joan M. Greig

Aurora, Ohio

Not the same ball game

The opinion piece "The Unspoiled Crack of the Bat" (Oct. 17) talked about how baseball hasn't changed, but Major League Baseball in the 1990s is quite different from what it was in the 1890s.

Baseball these days isn't about green fields and red ropes. It is about money. Owners talk of moving teams just so more fans will come to the stadiums. Effective, but is that how owners should show loyalty to their clubs? The richer teams can now buy up all of the good players, leaving smaller teams with young players or worn-out veterans.

Next

Page:   1   |   2

Share