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What do you see in D.C.?

Do you know what's what in Washington? Look at the photos on this page - but not at the ones on the facing page! Can you identify these sites in America's capital city? (If you need a hint, check out the map.) The answers are on Page 23.

(A) Its watery reflection looks different now that it's getting a $7 million overhaul. Inside are 192 commemorative stones, including one of solid jade. At the top is a small pyramid of aluminum, a rare metal when the structure was done in 1884. It's inscribed 'Laus Deo,' Latin for 'Praise Be to God.'

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(B) His stirring speech at a war-cemetery dedication was so brief that it took many listeners by surprise. Contrary to legend, he did not write it hastily on the back of an envelope, but crafted it carefully.

(C) This branch of government didn't even get its own building until 1935. Before that, it met in the Capitol. When the massive stone structure was finished, there was enough cash left in the building's $9.7 million budget to pay for all the furnishings inside - and still return $94,000 to the Treasury.

(D) Fala, a Scottish terrier, accompanied his master on many trips overseas. Now his statue is part of the most recent presidential memorial to be dedicated in Washington. It is the first memorial in the district to be purposely designed to be wheelchair accessible.

(E) In his epitaph he doesn't even mention his being president of the United States. Instead, he cites his authorship of the Declaration of Independence and the Statute of Virginia for Religious Freedom, and his founding of the University of Virginia.

(F) When the winning design for this monument was announced, it met a strong public outcry from those the memorial was meant to honor. Today, though, it is one of the most-visited sites in Washington.

(G) 'The Statue of Freedom' sits atop this famous dome wearing a Roman helmet. Sculptor Thomas Crawford had wanted her to wear a liberty cap, the symbol of freed slaves, but changed it when Secretary of War Jefferson Davis objected.

Answers: (A) Washington Monument (with renovation scaffolding); (B) Lincoln Memorial; (C) US Supreme Court Building; (D) Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial;

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(E) Jefferson Memorial; (F) Vietnam Veterans Memorial; (G) US Capitol.

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