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UH, YEAH, WE SERVE THAT MEAL

"Breakfast" may seem like a self-explanatory term. Try telling that to Tennessee lawmakers, who've been called on to come up with a definition that will end a dispute over which restaurants may be listed on "food ahead" signs - a choice form of advertising on Interstate highways. The signs are supposed to give first dibs to eateries serving three meals a day. So, how did two pizzerias qualify? Apparently, angry rivals claim, by offering coffee and doughnuts to their cleaning crews. Under a bill before the legislature, the day's first meal would have to include traditional fare like cereal, bacon, or toast. And no burgers, hot dogs, or prepackaged items.

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THAT'S ONE SHOW I NEVER MISS

An on-the-run Fort Lauderdale, Fla., murder suspect who heard he'd be featured on "America's Most Wanted" was arrested at a house in Las Vegas - while watching the Fox Network program. Richard Garber wasn't in that episode but was to be profiled soon, said a program spokesman. Guess that won't be necessary now.

Car thieves disdain SUVs, preferring Japanese imports

Sport utility vehicles aren't only unpopular with environmentalists; thieves don't fancy them much, either. The annual survey of CCC Information Services, which tracks trends in motor-vehicle theft claims for the insurance industry, reports a 15 percent drop in stolen SUVs last year compared to 1998 figures. The same wasn't true of pickup trucks, the Chicago-based group says. Their theft rate climbed nationally, and in Texas nine of the 10 most-stolen vehicles were pickups. For the third straight year, however, the top choices of car thieves were Japanese imports. The most popular targets:

1. 1989 Toyota Camry

2. 1990 Toyota Camry

3. 1991 Toyota Camry

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4. 1988 Toyota Camry

5. 1997 Ford F-150 4x2 pickup

6. 1994 Honda Accord EX

7. 1995 Honda Accord EX

8. 1996 Honda Accord LX

9. 1990 Honda Accord EX

10. 1994 Honda Accord LX

(c) Copyright 2000. The Christian Science Publishing Society


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